Parent Information

Adventure of Scouting

Outdoor Fun

Learning by doing is a hallmark of outdoor education. Unit meetings offer information and knowledge used on outdoor adventures. A leader may describe and demonstrate a Scouting skill at a meeting, but the way Scouts truly learn an outdoor skill is to do it themselves on a unit outing.

Service to others and good citizenship is learned through such outdoor activities as conservation projects, collecting food, building trails and shelters, and conducting community service projects that promote healthy living. Through helping other people, Scouts learn to appreciate how they can share themselves and their blessings to those in need. By giving service to benefit others, Scouts gain a sense of personal satisfaction.
 

A FAMILY PROGRAM TO GROW, LEARN, AND MAKE MEMORIES TOGETHER - START YOUR ADVENTURE TODAY

Family involvement is essential to Cub Scouting's success. When we talk about "family" in Cub Scouting, we're sensitive to the realities of present-day families. Many Cub Scouts do not come from traditional two-parent homes. Some boys live with a single parent or with other relatives or guardians. Cub Scouting considers a boy's family to be the people with whom he lives.

 

Family Activities As a program for the entire family, Cub Scouting can help families teach their children a wholesome system of values and beliefs while building and strengthening relationships among family members.

Your Role as a Parent
Cub Scouting helps parents and sons grow closer, and your involvement as a parent of a Cub Scout is vital.

Becoming a Leader
Volunteer leaders support Cub Scouting by serving in many roles, and often find great satisfaction in lending their support to youth and the community.

The BSA Family Award
The BSA Family Award program offers activities to help strengthen all families—whether two-parent, single-parent, or nontraditional.